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Evaluation of the initial specimen diversion technique (ISDT) for reducing blood culture contamination in children: a prospective randomized controlled trial

Published:August 01, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2022.07.013
      Blood cultures are one of the important tools for laboratory diagnosis of bloodstream infection [
      • Lamy B.
      • Dargère S.
      • Arendrup M.C.
      • Parienti J.-J.
      • Tattevin P.
      How to optimize the use of blood cultures for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections? A state-of-the art.
      ]. One of the main limitations of blood cultures is the occurrence of false-positive results caused by skin contaminants. False-positive results can impact on patient care, e.g., improper antibiotic treatment, additional investigations for possible infection, increased length of stay and higher costs [
      • Patton R.
      • Schmitt T.
      Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique.
      ,
      • Hall K.K.
      • Lyman J.A.
      Updated review of blood culture contamination.
      ]. Rates of blood culture contamination in children vary between centres but are typically not less than 3% [
      • El Feghaly RE
      • Chatterjee J
      • Dowdy K
      • Stempak LM
      • Morgan S
      • Needham W
      • et al.
      A quality improvement initiative: reducing blood culture contamination in a children’s hospital.
      ].
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